• The publication of Arya Jenkins’ “FOOLISH LOVE” is the eleventh in a series of short stories she has been commissioned to write for Jerry Jazz Musician.

     

  • You bring out the jazz in me
    The art blakey, max roach the roy haynes in me
    Seeing you  shake your hips like
    Congas…the way you move your hips to a mamba

     

  • In this edition, Paul features samples of Alex Steinweiss album covers, created during the early 1940’s, at the beginning of his career

     

     

  • Them knees,
    full of bees again,
     
    two gates
    flapping in a stuttering breeze,
  • “Foolish Love” — a short story by Arya Jenkins
  • "You Bring Out the Jazz in Me” — a poem by Erren Kelly
  • Cover Stories, with Paul Morris; Vol. 21
  • "Diddley-Bop-She-Bop" -- a poem by Michael L. Newell
Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #97

This pianist with a “categorization problem” is known primarily for his songwriting.  His songs have been recorded by the Who, Leon Russell and Bonnie Raitt, and is admired by the likes of Tom Waits, John Mayall, the Rolling Stones and Van Morrison.  He credited the songwriter Percy Mayfield, “the Poet Laureate of the Blues,” as being a major inspiration on his songwriting.  Who is he?

 

Dave Frishberg

Mose Allison

Ramsey Lewis

Phineas Newborn, Jr.

Vince Guaraldi

Tommy Flanagan

Paul Bley

 

Go to the next page for the answer!

 

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Uncategorized

“Jazz is Dying” — the state of jazz in LA

The April 5 edition of LA Weekly features a report on the closing of many Southern California jazz clubs and institutions, despite, writes Tom Meek, “the breakout of Kamasi Washington and the West Coast Get Down to a worldwide audience, and the award-winning film La La Land, which prominently featured Los Angeles jazz and provided work both on camera and off for dozens of area jazz musicians….[which] have all helped give L.A. jazz more

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Literature » Short Fiction

“All Aboard” — a short story by Susandale

    The dank and chilly hall echoed with a Marksmen rehearsal taking place. Lea and her spanking-new group rehearsed their music on a stage bordered by tables holding overturned chairs. And as David sat unnoticed in the dark hall, Lea’s caramel voice melted to run down the walls, and warm the empty pockets in his heart.                             

                                *Daydreams, I’ve got daydreams galore.

                                Cigarette ashes, there they go on the floor.”

     Scooting around, he wrestled with the chair’s wooden slats and wobbly legs versus his long limbs.    

     And while Lea was singing the third stanza, *”Let them laugh, let them frown … “ David was plotting his exit from the trailer. He was so engrossed with his plans that he didn’t notice the

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Features » Historic Journalism

Satchmo’s Stamp

During a recent stroll through the Internet, I was reminded of the story of Louis Armstrong requesting the use of Yogi Berra’s catcher’s mask during a 1960’s State Department tour of South America, “to fend off,” according to Armstrong’s widow Lucille, “the [enthusiastic South American] fans who wanted to touch his face and lips.”

Lucille’s recollection was disclosed in a December 10, 1981 letter to the U.S. Postal Service as part of a 14-year effort to have a postage stamp created in her husband’s honor.  Duke Ellington’s stamp was issued in 1986, and the likes of Elvis Presley, Bessie Smith, Nat Cole and Billie Holiday had commemorative stamps well before Armstrong.  How come?  Was it politics?

To read about it, check out the two stories below…The first is the letter of advocacy

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