• This edition of “Great Encounters” tells the story of the evening of the 1963 Grammy Awards, when Woody Herman met Bill Evans

  • When Miles Davis gets back into his mood
    I go where I need to be in my own
    somewhere in or near Matt Waldron’s Love Span
    over the River Tender where moons flow

  • The feature, titled “Bill Evans:  Intellect. Emotion. Communication” is an entertaining and (unsurprisingly) intelligent read, involving thoughts about the poetry of William Blake, Zen philosophy, being “anti-hipster”, life in Louisiana, his time with Miles Davis, golf, how the army shook up his confidence, and his own philosophy

     

     

  • The publication of Arya Jenkins’ “VOODOO RUN” is the twelfth in a series of short stories she has been commissioned to write for Jerry Jazz Musician.

  • Great Encounters #50
  • "Coldest Winter Night" - a poem by Ed Coletti
  • The December 1960 Down Beat story on Bill Evans
  • "Voodoo Run" - A short story by Arya Jenkins
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Witnessing the brilliance of Cecile McLorin Salvant

Last week I had the privilege of attending a show in Portland by vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant, the fast emerging superstar of jazz, of whom Wynton Marsalis has said “you get a singer like this once in a generation or two.”

The show – performed at the city’s 300 seat Old Church on August 30 – was one of the more astounding jazz performances I have ever seen.  Having been to hundreds (hell, probably thousands by now) of shows over the years in venues all over the globe, that is saying something!  I came away feeling as if I witnessed contemporary “greatness” of historic proportions.

Ms. Salvant, a 28-year-old native of Miami, was elegant, breathtaking, sensitive, angry, political, intellectual, adventurous, and everything in between (and always brilliant).  So many highlights — including Aaron Diehl’s performance on the Old Church organ, accompanying her on

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Features » Book Excerpts

Poet Jack Hirschman’s “Rifficals” and memories of Keystone Korner

In an enlightening essay found in Kathy Sloane’s entertaining history of Keystone Korner, the famed ‘70’s – 80’s North Beach San Francisco jazz club, the poet Jack Hirschman writes that “post-World War [II] jazz, abstract expressionism, and what I call field composition in poetry represent for me the trinity of essential American idioms that really are the foundation of not merely my work, but the work of virtually a whole generation of writers and musicians.”  Hirschman writes that he found inspiration for his poetry in the music of Monk (“he was like a poet writing in musical notes”), Charlie Parker and Cecil Taylor (“also a writing poet [who] fills the plane up and all the spaces”) and produced what he called “rifficals,” countless improvisations inspired by jazz that he passed out to the audience at the Keystone.

Like many of us, Hirschman believes jazz is a centerpiece of our cultural history.  “The African American dimension has been a major influence on virtually all the artists in this country,” he writes, “even if people

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