• In a critical essay, Matt Sweeney writes how John Coltrane and Dave Brubeck transform the blues into a musical experience way beyond its very simple three-chord structure

     

  • Eight poets connect their poems to the spirit of jazz in this eight page collection

     

  • In this edition, the writer Francis Paudras tells a short story about a backstage encounter between Bud Powell and Charles Mingus following a 1964 performance in Paris

     

     

     

  • “The Wailing Wall” is the winner of the 48th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Contest

  • "Transcending the Blues" - by Matt Sweeney
  • Poems by eight poets
  • Great Encounters #53
  • "The Wailing Wall" - a story by Justin Short
Features » Book Excerpts

“Jazz is too good for Americans!”

Being disgusted with Congress is, of course, nothing new…In an excerpt from Dizzy Gillespie’s 1979 autobiography (written with Al Fraser) to BE, or not . . . to BOP, Dizzy reminds us of the thick-headed politicians of 1957 who questioned the “exorbitant” fees paid to him and his band during their 1956 State Department-sponsored tour of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Europe and South America.

In this excerpt — from a chapter titled “Higher Than Ike” —  Dizzy cynically writes about the “thanks” he received from members of Congress following the tour, as well as the controversy concerning his

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Literature » Short Fiction

“Lay Out” — a short story by Barnaby Hazen

            You’ve played this gig at the Tennyson Lodge at least a hundred times by now you figure—three years times twice a week, Wednesdays and Thursdays. You just took a solo and now The Kid is thumping on his oversized instrument, oversized by comparison to his body. He’s a five-foot-nothing of a chubby student bassist having joined the quartet two weeks prior. His dark, stylishly teased hair is stuck in place by product, his eyes just barely open and he rocks left to right in a manner offensive to you for some reason.

            You don’t need a reason. You’ve been doing this long enough to call it like you see it and The Kid is nothing more than a vaguely promising hack. You might want to talk to him on break, get a better idea where his head is at, but meanwhile he’s wiggling around and you kind of hope he gets caught under a

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Uncategorized

An invitation to writers and poets

Hello folks:

In November I will be devoting space to the music and culture of World War II, the centerpiece of which will be my interview with author Gary Giddins, whose highly anticipated book Bing Crosby:  Swinging on a Star, The War Years, 1940 – 1946, will be released at that time.

I am seeking a limited number of short stories and poems about events, figures, music, etc.  that can be associated with the World War II era.    While I am unable to

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