Photography by Russell Dupont

January 3rd, 2020

 

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“Orange Quartet” by Russell Dupont

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…..New England artist Russell Dupont possesses a great love of jazz, art and photography.  His paintings, prints and photographs have been widely exhibited, and are in a number of public and private collections, including the Print Collection of The Boston Public Library; The Art Collections of both Brigham & Women’s Hospital and The Dana Farber Cancer Institute. He is a former artist-in-residence at the Milton Art Museum, and his work was featured in the Fall collection of poetry on Jerry Jazz Musician, published in October.

…..Russell is also the author of two novels — King & Train and Waiting for the Turk; two chapbooks of poetry – Winter, 1948 and Establishing Home Plate; and two non-fiction chapbooks — Up in Wisconsin: Travels with Kinsley and There Is No Dam Now At Richford.

…..Th The “before and after” work featured in this post utilizes a combination of Russell’s love for jazz, art, and photography, and when combined with modern digital technology, results in a rare way to experience the art of the music.

…..Russell introduces his work…

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“Come on babe
why don’t we paint the town,
and all that Jazz”

[Music by John Kander
and Lyrics by Fred Ebb]

 

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…..I had the fortune to grow up around uncles, not much older than I, who had an intense interest in jazz and passed that along to me. At first, I didn’t have a clue when they spoke about a “Bird” or a “Monk,” or some guy they called “Cannonball.”  But eventually, I began to absorb and even understand some of what they were talking about and listening to. Around the same time, when I was in my teens, I picked up a camera and began photographing my friends and walking the streets of Boston taking pictures.

…..Somewhere along the way, I saw some photos by a photographer, William Claxton; photos of the same artists whose records my uncles played. Years later, I experienced the same surge of excitement when I looked at the jazz collages of an artist named Romare Bearden and something clicked — the realization that jazz and art were intimately connected.

…..Boston had a pretty lively jazz scene at the time, along with an iconic radio personality, Norm Nathan, whose show “Sounds in the Night’ lulled me to sleep but it never would have dawned on me to walk into The Hi-Hat or Wally’s, pull out my camera and star snapping pictures.

…..I heard that, on a few summer nights, a group of three or four guys got together on the front steps on one of the buildings in the notorious Columbia Point Housing Project and played jazz. I lived a short walk away in South Boston, picked up my camera and wandered over one evening. Four of those photos appear here. The other four were taken one summer day when I stumbled across a jazz “festival” set up outside of the Jordan Marsh Department Store in Boston.

…..My photographic style at that time was straight-up, get-in-your-face photography; but I remember reading a quote by some famous photographer — “The photo is only the beginning” — and began “playing” with my photos; painting over them, cutting them up for montages, altering them in different ways; often tedious work when my darkroom was in the bathroom and I had to wait until my children were in bed before getting to work.

…..Then, computers and programs like Photoshop arrived and I found a multitude of ways to alter, enhance, change some of the photos I took. The photos here represent my love of jazz, my love of art and my love of photography.

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-Russell Dupont

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The “Columbia Point” Photographs

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“Sax”

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“Um Abraco No Getz”

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“Groovin'”

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“Drummer”

 

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The “Jazz Festival” Photographs

 

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“Bamboo Flute Blues”

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“Combo”

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“Flutist”

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“Orange Quartet”

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All photographs copyright Russell Dupont

For more information about Russell’s work, visit his website by clicking here

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In this Issue

Art by Russell Dupont
Twenty-eight poets contribute 37 poems to the Jerry Jazz Musician Fall Poetry Collection, living proof that the energy and spirit of jazz is alive — and quite well.

Interview

photo by Francis Wolff/© Mosaic Images
Interview with Paul Lopes, author of Art Rebels: Race, Class and Gender in the Art of Miles Davis and Martin Scorsese

Book Excerpt

In the introduction to Jazz and Justice: Racism and the Political Economy of the Music, author Gerald Horne writes about the severe cultural and economic obstacles jazz musicians have encountered since the music's inception

Short Fiction

Photo/CC0 Public Doman
Short Fiction Contest-winning story #52 — “Random Blonde,” by Zandra Renwick

Poetry

Image by Matthias Gabriel from Pixabay
"Up in the Attic" -- a poem by Alan Yount

Jazz History Quiz #132

photo of Dizzy Gillespie by Brian McMillen
This legendary saxophonist has worked with Lionel Hampton, Johnny Hodges, Dizzy Gillespie (pictured), Art Blakey, and Art Farmer, and has become known as much for his compositions as the greatness of his horn playing, having written standards like “I Remember Clifford,” “Killer Joe,” and “Along Came Betty.” Who is he?

Essay

photo of Esbjorn Svensson Trio/Pkobel/Creative Commons
“The Trio That Should Have Reshaped Jazz” — an essay by Scott Archer Jones

Photography

photo of Jackie McLean by Veryl Oakland
Veryl Oakland’s “Jazz in Available Light” — photos (and stories) of Mal Waldron, Jackie McLean and Joe Henderson

Great Encounters

photo of Sidney Bechet by William Gottlieb/Library of Congress
In this edition of "Great Encounters," Con Chapman, author of Rabbit’s Blues: The Life and Music of Johnny Hodges, writes about Hodges’ early musical training, and the first meeting he had with Sidney Bechet, the influential and legendary reed player who Hodges called “tops in my book.”

Interview

photo by Michael Lionstar
In a wide-ranging interview, Nate Chinen, former New York Times jazz critic and currently the director of editorial content for WBGO (Jazz) Radio, talks about his book Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century,, described by Herbie Hancock as a “fascinating read” that shows Chinen’s “firm support of the music

“What are 4 or 5 of your all-time favorite Blue Note albums?”

"What are 4 or 5 of your all-time favorite Blue Note albums?"
Dianne Reeves, Nate Chinen, Gary Giddins, Michael Cuscuna, Eliane Elias and Ashley Kahn are among the 12 writers, musicians, and music executives who list and write about their favorite Blue Note albums

Pressed for All Time

"Jazz Samba"/Verve Records
In this edition, excerpted from Michael Jarrett's Pressed For All Time, legendary producer Creed Taylor remembers the 1962 Stan Getz recording, Jazz Samba

Interview

Photographer Carol Friedman
In an entertaining conversation that also features a large volume of her famous photography, Carol Friedman discusses her lifelong work of distinction in the world of jazz photography

Art

“Me, Thinking about Nona Faustine” — a photo-narrative by Charles Ingham

Humor

photo by William Gottlieb/Library of Congress
"Every Soul is a Circus," by Dig Wayne

Short Fiction

photo/Creative Commons CC0.
Con Chapman, author of Rabbit's Blues: The Life and Music of Johnny Hodges, contributes a humorous short story, "Father Kniest: Jazz Priest"

In the Previous Issue

photo of Sullivan Fortner by Carol Friedman
“The Jazz Photography Issue” features an interview with today’s most eminent jazz portrait photographer Carol Friedman, news from Michael Cuscuna about newly released Francis Wolff photos, as well as archived interviews with William Gottlieb, Herman Leonard, Lee Tanner, a piece on Milt Hinton, a new edition of photos from Veryl Oakland, and much more…

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