Two poems by John Jack Jackie (Edward) Cooper

May 7th, 2019

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Trajet

Introspeculative — to Sun Ra,
Saturday night: on one (actually, Sun
Da morning) — terrible swift disin-
clination to forgive the equally
terrible tyranny of time signa-
ture, attesting to what can, which must not —
that, that ken abundant wherever choi-
ces be told: rs, joints, and drums, drum rolls dif-
ferently drummed bold voyager extra-
galactic strums! Musica like notes
dotted to dot dice, acymbolative, rolled.
So, never stop: keep on pushin’, all the way
home. Grave, groovin’ gravity — he-, she-,
who-li-o — field, felt, most profoundly,
playing inside your head: feels you should get down.

Just let it.

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Repeat

Listening to Miles (Birth of the Cool)
transports me kilomètres: I get Black and White, y’know,
and go all film noirNouvelle vague … moves this tail;
Jean-Pierre Melville, he’s my daddy tonight!

It don’t bother him if I’m happy —
[Repeat]

when Ornette takes the stage, then fades to bright:
however darken, in real life — fallen star;
the world of my mind turns technicolored.

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John Jack Jackie (Edward) Cooper is the creator of These Are Aphorithms (http://aphorithms.blogspot.com), author of Ten (Poets Wear Prada, 2012) and Ten … more (Poets Wear Prada, 2016). His American English translation of Wax Women, with French texts of the original poems by Jean-Pierre Lemesle and photographs by Henry Jacobs (International Art Office: Paris, 1985), drew acclaim and dedicated full-window display from the Gotham Book Mart in New York — legendary fishing hole to the “wise” — released in the United States the following year. His work has appeared in Brownstone Poets 2013; The Venetian Hour, Dinner with the Muse, Part II; CLWR 49, CLWR 50, Guinevere Review, and the Unbearables AnthologySomewhere to Nowhere: The End of the American Dream(Autonomatia, 2017); online, at exitstrata.com, in the Sweet Tree Review, .Rat’s Ass Review, and Anti-Heroin Chic; forthcoming, in “The Bug Book” (Poets Wear Prada, 2019). Editor and co-publisher of Poets Wear Prada, a small press based in Hoboken, New Jersey, he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. His whereabouts have been numerous, like his names, but, unlike them, currently unknown.

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