Poems by eight poets

August 10th, 2018

Eight poets — Michael L. Newell, Aurora Lewis, Roger Singer, Lawrence J. Klumas, Freddington, Victor Enns, dan smith and John Stupp — connect their poems to the spirit of jazz in this eight page collection…
_____
Three Miniatures for Jazz Greats
by Michael L. Newell
Sketches of Spain
 
dark blue, deeper blue
than the gloaming, trumpet flows —
oceanic grief
 
 
A Love Supreme
 
hurricane touches down
Coltrane blows away
life’s masks  see bones beneath
 
 
For Junior Mance & Horace Silver
 
their pianos know
the streets and strut freely,
let your feet fly
_____
 

 

Michael L. Newell has lived abroad for one-third of his life in thirteen countries on five continents.  He has recently had poems published in Current and Verse-Virtual.  He has a new book of poems coming out from Bellowing Ark Press in Seattle within the next few months.  Its title is Meditation of an Old Man Standing on a Bridge.

 

 

 

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35 comments on “Poems by eight poets”

  1. I clearly visualize Spain’s intensely blue skies in “Sketches of Spain.” The last line of that poem is stunning–doing exactly what powerful music does–opens the soul. I look forward to reading your forthcoming book of poems.

  2. I clearly visualize Spain’s intensely blue skies in “Sketches of Spain.” The last line of that poem is stunning–doing exactly what powerful music does–opens the soul. I look forward to reading your forthcoming book of poems.

  3. “Pure Vinyl” is a good poem about one of my favorite albums, Two of a Mind. Well-done. It is a pleasure to see Mulligan and Desmond given their considerable due. I wore out my vinyl copy years ago.

  4. “Pure Vinyl” is a good poem about one of my favorite albums, Two of a Mind. Well-done. It is a pleasure to see Mulligan and Desmond given their considerable due. I wore out my vinyl copy years ago.

    1. Thanks Michael. I have both the vinyl and the CD. Your three short poems are great. Your contributions wonderful.

  5. “Motion (for Elvin Jones)”: It is a pleasure to see one of the often ignored greats being given his due, a smoking hot drummer being honored with appropriate language. Way cool.

  6. “Motion (for Elvin Jones)”: It is a pleasure to see one of the often ignored greats being given his due, a smoking hot drummer being honored with appropriate language. Way cool.

  7. “Revelation” is good work. The final two stanzas are outstanding. They raise the hair on the back of my neck.

    1. Dear Mr. Newell:

      So glad that you liked my poem. I plan to add this to either my jazz poems set or my Cleveland Suite with The Deep Cleveland Trio.

  8. I greatly enjoy John Stupp’s poem, “Four Pigeons” — I can envision Carl Sandburg reading it and bestowing his blessing on such fine work.

  9. I greatly enjoy John Stupp’s poem, “Four Pigeons” — I can envision Carl Sandburg reading it and bestowing his blessing on such fine work.

  10. “What Billie Sang About” is a poem that touches the heart, and summons up a jazz giant in all her pain and musical power. One can feel the empathy the poet has for the singer.

  11. “What Billie Sang About” is a poem that touches the heart, and summons up a jazz giant in all her pain and musical power. One can feel the empathy the poet has for the singer.

  12. Roger Singer’s “Release” captures admirably the pain, grief, and loss that has filled the work of so many jazz artists over the past century. Powerful work.

  13. Roger Singer’s “Release” captures admirably the pain, grief, and loss that has filled the work of so many jazz artists over the past century. Powerful work.

  14. So proud to publish such talented poets, and to see a community develop. I am very grateful to all writers who think enough of Jerry Jazz Musician to submit work for consideration.

  15. So proud to publish such talented poets, and to see a community develop. I am very grateful to all writers who think enough of Jerry Jazz Musician to submit work for consideration.

  16. All of the poems had some great poetic technique. I enjoyed them all. For Michael Newell. All the poems you have had in JJM, I have liked very much. You have a way of creating imagery, that really stays in the mind.

  17. All of the poems had some great poetic technique. I enjoyed them all. For Michael Newell. All the poems you have had in JJM, I have liked very much. You have a way of creating imagery, that really stays in the mind.

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In this Issue

Art by Russell Dupont
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