“It’s Too Darn Hot”

August 9th, 2018

 

Heat Index for August 8, 2018

 

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In June of 2017, the American president chose to leave the Paris climate agreement because, he said at the time, it is an agreement that “disadvantages the United States to the exclusive benefit of other countries.”  It seems that climate change knows no borders, and nobody benefits from our dear leader’s willful ignorance — witness the record heat and fires across the U.S., and indeed now all over the globe.

Oh well, we too can willfully ignore climate change today by finding a cool corner of our world and cranking up Cole Porter’s “It’s Too Darn Hot,” a song written for the Broadway musical “Kiss Me Kate” in 1948, and made famous by Ella Fitzgerald on her 1956 recording, Sings The Cole Porter Songbook.  Three versions of the song (including Ella’s) are found below the song’s lyrics.

 

 

Cole Porter, backstage at Kiss Me Kate, 1948

 

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It’s Too Darn Hot
by Cole Porter
 
 
It’s too darn hot
It’s too darn hot
I’d like to sup with my baby tonight
Refill the cup with my baby tonight
I’d like to sup with my baby tonight
Refill the cup with my baby tonight
But I ain’t up to my baby tonight
‘Cause it’s too darn hot
 
It’s too darn hot
It’s too darn hot
I’d like to coo with my baby tonight
And pitch the woo with my baby tonight
I’d like to coo with my baby tonight
And pitch the woo with my baby tonight
But brother, you fight my baby tonight
‘Cause it’s too darn hot
 
According to the Kinsey Report, ev’ry average man you know
Much prefers his lovey-dovey to court
When the temperature is low
But when the thermometer goes ‘way up
And the weather is sizzling hot
Mister, pants for romance is not
 
‘Cause it’s too, too, too darn hot
It’s too darn hot
It’s too, too darn hot
 
I’d like to coo with my baby tonight
And pitch the woo with my baby tonight
I’d like to coo with my baby tonight
And pitch the woo with my baby tonight
But brother, you fight my baby tonight
‘Cause it’s too darn hot
 
According to the Kinsey Report, ev’ry average man you know
Much prefers his lovey-dovey to court
When the temperature is low
But when the thermometer goes ‘way up
And the weather is sizzling hot
Mr. Gob for his squab
A marine for his queen
A G.I. for his cutie-pie is not
 
‘Cause it’s too, too, too darn hot
It’s too darn hot
It’s too darn hot
It’s too darn hot
It’s too darn hot
It’s too darn hot
 
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Songwriters: Cole Porter
Too Darn Hot lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ella Fitzgerald’s version, from the Cole Porter Songbook, recorded in 1956

 

From the 1953 film Kiss Me Kate, Ann Miller sings “Too Darn Hot”

 

A 2002 film of the UK Kiss Me Kate cast performing “Too Darn Hot” 

 

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In This Issue

This issue features an interview with Bing Crosby biographer Gary Giddins; a collection of poetry devoted to the World War II era; and a new edition of “Reminiscing in Tempo,” in which the question “What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz recordings of the 1940’s” is posed to Rickie Lee Jones, Chick Corea, Tom Piazza and others.

Features

In this edition of Reminiscing in Tempo,, Chick Corea, Rickie Lee Jones, Tom Piazza, Gary Giddins, Randy Brecker, Michael Cuscuna, Terry Teachout and many others answer the question, “What are 3 or 4 of your favorite recordings of the 1940’s?”

Interviews

Interview with Bing Crosby biographer Gary Giddins, author of the new book "Swinging on a Star: The War Years, 1940 - 1946"

Poetry

Eight poets — John Stupp, Aurora Lewis, Michael L. Newell, Robert Nisbet, Alan Yount, Roger Singer, dan smith and Joan Donovan — write about the era of World War II

The Joys of Jazz

Award winning radio producer and host Bob Hecht shares his love of jazz through his podcasts on his site “The Joys of Jazz.” In this edition, he tells two stories; the history of the virtual anthem of World War II, “I’ll Be Seeing You,” and the friendship and musical rapport of Bing Crosby and Louis Armstrong.

Short Fiction

Hannah Draper of Ottawa, Ontario is the winner of the 49th Jerry Jazz Musician New Short Fiction Award. Her story is titled "Will You Play For Me?"

Coming Soon

Three prominent scholars in a conversation about the lives of Billie Holiday, Ralph Ellison, and Langston Hughes (pictured)

Contributing writers

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