“Roland’s Sweet-Sweet Tout de Suite” — a poem by Ed Coletti

November 24th, 2017

“Rahsaan Roland Kirk” by Stanley Pransky

 

 

Roland’s Sweet-Sweet Tout de Suite

 

  1. Kirk

 

Gifts and Messages. Which
the more important?
Dissonance launches
me listening feels
more like I’m playing that
swooping of sax waiting counterbal-
answer slowly fading

 

  1. Shine On Me

 

Begins with a raggedy ragtime Then that Fourth of July soprano
saxing something about happiness and
of all places the South even if
it is all about New Orleans, sort of
a different part of another South
a frenchier South where pianos rule
Where Roland Kirk, before he was Rashaan,
blew his ever-music-lovin’ brains out.

 

  1. Rashaan

 

What was that trumpet quote
from Clifford Brown so all about
enough to claim the son’s name?
On Saturday night jump through
all over Harlem, New Orleans, or
even late-Basie in Kansas City
in May, springtime where piano
keys hammer strings-why piano’s
a percussive instrument played right
here well-before  more obvious August.
That plucking going on before
our sax returns to jump back in and

 

 

  1. Finish

 

What’s that mean after all?
After all, that means what?
That what after all means
To Finish? Two who finish
What after all, too finished,
art, jazz, poetry aren’t
Much more than stony-stupid.
Only unfinished giving continues.

 

 

  1. Continuing

 

On and on and on and through
a starship first breaking through
this light barrier into endlessness
Hyperspace forever out there
doubling and tripling back
on itself until and after and before
all continues becoming itself and
everything over and over on and on.

 

 

_____

 

 

 

Ed Coletti is a poet widely published internationally and he curates the popular blog “No Money In Poetry.”  Additionally, Ed is a painter. middling chess player, and harmonica player.  He lives with his wife Joyce in Santa Rosa, California.  His upcoming book is titled Apollo Blue’s Hard and The Gods of Spring.

 

*

 

Share this:

Comment on this article:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

In This Issue

This issue features an interview with Bing Crosby biographer Gary Giddins; a collection of poetry devoted to the World War II era; and a new edition of “Reminiscing in Tempo,” in which the question “What are 3 or 4 of your favorite jazz recordings of the 1940’s” is posed to Rickie Lee Jones, Chick Corea, Tom Piazza and others.

Features

In this edition of Reminiscing in Tempo,, Chick Corea, Rickie Lee Jones, Tom Piazza, Gary Giddins, Randy Brecker, Michael Cuscuna, Terry Teachout and many others answer the question, “What are 3 or 4 of your favorite recordings of the 1940’s?”

Interviews

Interview with Bing Crosby biographer Gary Giddins, author of the new book "Swinging on a Star: The War Years, 1940 - 1946"

Poetry

Eight poets — John Stupp, Aurora Lewis, Michael L. Newell, Robert Nisbet, Alan Yount, Roger Singer, dan smith and Joan Donovan — write about the era of World War II

The Joys of Jazz

Award winning radio producer and host Bob Hecht shares his love of jazz through his podcasts on his site “The Joys of Jazz.” In this edition, he tells two stories; the history of the virtual anthem of World War II, “I’ll Be Seeing You,” and the friendship and musical rapport of Bing Crosby and Louis Armstrong.

Short Fiction

Hannah Draper of Ottawa, Ontario is the winner of the 49th Jerry Jazz Musician New Short Fiction Award. Her story is titled "Will You Play For Me?"

Coming Soon

Three prominent scholars in a conversation about the lives of Billie Holiday, Ralph Ellison, and Langston Hughes (pictured)

Contributing writers

Site Archive