Reminiscing in Tempo: Memories and Opinion/Volume Eleven: What were five of your favorite record albums (or CD’s) when you were twenty years old, and what are five of your favorite CD’s today?

March 5th, 2008

 

 

Reminiscing in Tempo

*

Memories and Opinion

_____

 

“Reminiscing in Tempo” is part of a continuing effort to provide Jerry Jazz Musician readers with unique forms of “edu-tainment.” As often as possible, Jerry Jazz Musician poses one question via e mail to a small number of prominent and diverse people. The question is designed to provoke a lively response that will potentially include the memories and/or opinion of those solicited.

Since it is not possible to know who will answer the question, the diversity of the participants will often depend on factors beyond the control of the publisher. The responses from the people who chose to participate in this edition are published below with only minor stylistic editing. No follow-up questions take place.

_____

What were five of your favorite record albums (or CD’s) when you were twenty years old, and what are five of your favorite CD’s today?

Originally published March, 2008

 


Let’s see …when I was 20 years old (a scant 3 decades ago), I was busy touring with the Stan Kenton big band. There was plenty of opportunity to listen to albums during those long bus rides; I’m afraid that those listening sessions involved cassette tapes, however. Any break in the band’s touring schedule would allow me to go home with LPs I had purchased during my travels and dub those records onto cassette. In any event, if memory serves correct, these were 5 artists/albums that I recall listening to a lot in hotel rooms and while traversing the USA’s Interstate system as a passenger on the Kenton bus …

1. Weather Report “Mysterious Traveler”

2. Keith Jarrett “Expectations” and “Facing You”

3. Aretha Franklin “Young, Gifted & Black”

4. Claude Debussy piano music (a 5 album compilation on the Vox label, played by pianist Peter Frankl)

5. John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme” and “Kulu Se Mama”

I also listened quite a bit to Chick Corea’s “Now He Sings, Now He Sobs” and ECM piano improvisation albums, plus the big band albums of Thad & Mel, Dizzy Gillespie (“New Continent” composed & arranged by Lalo Schifrin, w/ Mel Lewis on drums), Stan’s “Cuban Fire” album (again, with Mel), The Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland album “Latin Kaleidoscope” (featuring a wonderful suite written by Gary McFarland), Miles Davis’ “Live/Evil,” Sergio Mendes “Primal Roots” and the Mahavishnu Orchestra album “Birds of Fire,” Billy Cobham’s “Spectrum” and “Crosswinds” albums, Herbie Hancock’s “Crossings” plus Jerry Goldsmith’s “Planet of the Apes” soundtrack score!

Favorite CDs today? I could still include “Mysterious Traveler” and “A Love Supreme” as well as “Cuban Fire.” Other candidates, according to my iPod, are Count Basie’s “Breakfast Dance and Barbecue,” Glenn Gould’s second “Goldberg Variations” recording, and several of Mahler’s symphonies. I must also mention the Mosaic compilation of Elvin Jones’ Blue Note recordings!

 

 

___________________________________________________________________

THEN

EDDIE HARRIS — “THE IN SOUND”

THE THREE SOUNDS — “THE BLUE HOUR”

MITCHELL /RUFF DUO — “LITTLE GIRL BLUE”

OSCAR PETERSON TRIO — “AFFINITY”

MILES DAVIS — “WALKIN'”

TODAY

JIM MCNEELY/SWISS JAZZ ORCHESTRA — “PAUL KLEE”

BELÅ BARTOK — “THE WOODEN PRINCE”

MARIA SCHNEIDER — “ALLEGRESSE”

OLIVIER MESSIAEN — “TURANGALILA SYMPHONIE”

MILES DAVIS — “PLUGGED NICKEL” (BOX SET)

 

 


I can honestly say that several of my favorite albums when I was 20 remain embedded as favorites of mine today. Eric Dolphy’s “Out To Lunch,” Miles’ “In A Silent Way,” John Coltrane and Don Cherry’s “The Avant Garde” and Cherry’s “Symphony for Improvisers” are on both lists. I think at 20 I was enamored of Jefferson Airplane’s “After Bathing At Baxter’s”; less so today, though it still gives me chills. But today I would add Cecil Taylor’s “Air Above Mountains” among my five favorites. Or Wes Montgomery “Live at the Half Note.”

It feels SO unfair to name only five. At 20 I also was crazy about Cherry’s “Complete Communion,” “Eddie Palmieri Live at Sing Sing,” Tony Williams’ Lifetime “(Emergency!),” John McLaughlin’s “Devotion,” Chick Corea’s “Now He Sings Now He Sobs,” “Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus” and “Mingus Presents Mingus,” “Unit Structures “and “Conquistador,” Coltrane’s “Impressions” (with Dolphy), “Rip Rig & Panic “(Roland Kirk, pre-Rahsaan days), Joseph Jarman’s “Song For,” Miles Davis Quartet “In The Beginning, “Speckled Red’s “The Dirty Dozens,” Junior Wells’ “Hoodoo Man Blues,” Sam Rivers’ “Contours,” “This Is Jeremy Steig,” “Monk’s Music” (with Coltrane, Coleman Hawkins, Ray Copeland), Roscoe Mitchell’s “Numbers One and Two,” and “Maiden Voyage.”

Today I would add Jelly Roll Morton’s “Red Hot Peppers,” “Inside Betty Carter,” “Solo Monk,” “Science Fiction” and “Of Human Feelings,” “The Best of Little Walter,” “The David Murray Big Band Live at Sweet Basil Vol. 1,” any collection of solo James P. Johnson, Fats Waller and Donald Lambert, Herbie Nichols’ trios on Blue Note, “Electric Ladyland,” The Meters and The Wild Tchipitoulas, Anthony Braxton’s “Three Compositions of the New Jazz,” Professor Longhair “New Orleans Piano” (on Atlantic), Dewey Redman’s “Ear of the Behearer,” Olivier Messiaen’s “Turangalîla Symphony,” King Sunny Ade’s “Syncro System,” “On The Corner” and “Bitches Brew,” James Newton’s “African Flower” . . . I know these seem decades old, mostly, and I DO listen to music that’s come out more recently but fewer of those lodge into “favorites” status — maybe those places are already taken. Ah, I know two: Herbie Hancock’s “Gershwin’s World” and “River: The Joni Letters, “which just won a Grammy. Maybe it will lose its luster, but it sounds quite good to me currently.

 

 

 

 

_________________________________________________________________

Then…

Miles’ “Four and More”

Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme”

Joan Armatrading — “Secet Secrets”

Joni Mitchell — “Wild Things Run Fast”

Sweet Honey In The Rock — “The Other Side”

And now…

Maxwell — “Now”

Rachelle Ferell — “Individuality”

Missy Elliot — “Miss E So Addictive”

Shirley Horn — “Here’s to Life”

Meshell Ndegeocello– “Cookie: The Anthropological Mixtape”

 

 

 

 

 


At 20:

1) Wayne Shorter — Atlantis

2) Miles Davis Quintet — E.S.P.

3) Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers — Caravan

4) Bob Marley & the Wailers — Rastaman Vibration

5) Wynton Marsalis — Black Codes from the Underground

These days:

1) Shirley Horn — You Won’t Forget Me

2) Sonny Rollins — The Bridge

3) Astor Piazzola — Anos De Soledad (Boxed Set)

4) Lester Young — The Complete Lester Young Studio Sessions on Verve

5) Bob Marley & the Wailers — Exodus

 

Share this:

Comment on this article:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

In This Issue

Michael Cuscuna, Mosaic Records co-founder, is interviewed about his successful career as a jazz producer, discographer, and entrepreneur...Also in this issue, in celebration of Blue Note’s 80th year, we asked prominent writers and musicians the following question: “What are 4 or 5 of your all-time favorite Blue Note albums; a new collection of jazz poetry; “On the Turntable,” is a new playlist of 18 recently released jazz recordings from six artists – Joshua Redman, Joe Lovano, Matt Brewer, Tom Harrell, Zela Margossian and Aaron Burnett; two new podcasts by Bob Hecht; a new “Jazz History Quiz”; a new feature called “Pressed for All Time,”; a new photo-narrative by Charles Ingham; and…lots more.

On the Turntable

This month, a playlist of 18 recently released jazz recordings by six artists -- Joshua Redman, Joe Lovano. Matt Brewer, Tom Harrell, Zela Margossian, and Aaron Burnett

Poetry

In this month’s collection, with great jazz artists at the core of their work, 16 poets remember, revere, ponder, laugh, dream, and listen

The Joys of Jazz

In this new volume of his podcasts, Bob presents two stories, one on Clifford Brown (featuring the trumpeter Charlie Porter) and the other is part two of his program on stride piano, including a conversation with Mike Lipskin

Short Fiction

Short Fiction Contest-winning story #51 — “Crossing the Ribbon,” by Linnea Kellar

“What are 4 or 5 of your all-time favorite Blue Note albums?”

Dianne Reeves, Nate Chinen, Gary Giddins, Michael Cuscuna, Eliane Elias and Ashley Kahn are among the 12 writers, musicians, and music executives who list and write about their favorite Blue Note albums

Pressed for All Time

In an excerpt from his book Pressed for All Time, Michael Jarrett interviews producer Creed Taylor about how he came to use tape overdubs during the 1957 Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross Sing a Song of Basie recording session

Art

“Thinking about the Truesdells” — a photo-narrative by Charles Ingham

Jazz History Quiz #128

Although he was famous for modernizing the sound of the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra -- “On the Sunny Side of the Street” was his biggest hit while working for Dorsey (pictured) -- this arranger will forever be best-known for his work with the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra. Who is he?

Great Encounters

In this edition, Bob Dylan recalls what Thelonious Monk told him about music at New York’s Blue Note club in c. 1961.

Art

Jerry Jazz Musician regularly publishes a series of posts featuring excerpts of the photography and stories/captions found in Jazz in Available Light by Veryl Oakland. In this edition, Mr. Oakland's photographs and stories feature Stan Getz, Sun Ra, and Carla Bley.

Interviews

Maxine Gordon, author of Sophisticated Giant: The Life and Legacy of Dexter Gordon, discusses her late husband’s complex, fascinating life.

Cover Stories with Paul Morris

In this edition, Paul writes about jazz album covers that offer glimpses into intriguing corners of the culture of the 1950’s

Coming Soon

"The Photography Issue" will feature an interview with jazz photographer Carol Friedman (her photo of Wynton Marsalis is pictured), as well as with Michael Cuscuna on unreleased photos by Blue Note's Francis Wolff.

In the previous issue

Jeffrey Stewart, National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke, is interviewed about Locke (pictured), the father of the Harlem Renaissance. Also in this issue…A new collection of jazz poetry; "On the Turntable," a new playlist of 19 recommended recordings by five jazz artists; three new podcasts by Bob Hecht; a new “Great Encounters”; several short stories; the photography of Veryl Oakland and Charles Ingham; a new Jazz History Quiz; and lots more…

Contributing writers

Site Archive