• A brief history of World War II’s impact on New York’s 52nd Street, as told by Arnold Shaw, author of 52nd Street:  The Street of Jazz
  • In this edition, Art Blakey tells a story of Thelonious Monk, Coleman Hawkins and John Coltrane that took place during the 1957 recording session of Monk’s Music.

     

  • Poet Lawrence J. Klumas honors the jazz singer Chris Connor


     

     

  • Ms. Larson’s story, “The Happy Thing of Bayou de Manque,” is the winner of the 47th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Contest.
  • "War Comes to 52nd Street"
  • Great Encounters #52
  • A poetic appreciation of Chris Connor
  • A short story by Erin Larson
Art

The art of John Allinson

In his description of Welsh painter John Allinson’s work “House of Dreams” – a mural in progress “celebrating a viewpoint of entertainment as an art form” that will eventually be 1000 feet wide – the art critic Rex Harley wrote that “a host of artists and entertainers emerge from a swirl of colours, in the same way that their counterparts stepped out from the stream of history to entertain and enrich our lives.” 

This is also an apt view of Allinson’s prolific and noteworthy interpretations of jazz ensembles.  His work evokes appropriate nostalgia and sentimentality while expressing passion for the culture of jazz music by

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Uncategorized

“I saw records made…”

The “record” business continues to make an impressive comeback.  Although actual record sales make up a small fraction of the $8.7 billion music industry, according to Nielsen, the 14.32 million records sold in 2017 was up 9% over the previous year, and the Lp format accounted for 14% of all physical album sales.

This resurgence is evident in my city, Portland, where many neighborhoods are anchored by restaurants and coffee shops spinning record albums, and often include

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Interviews » Biographers

Revisiting Gil Evans

     An early interview I conducted as publisher of Jerry Jazz Musician was with Stephanie Stein Crease, whose 2002 biography of Gil Evans, Out of the Cool, was an illuminating history of a man the jazz writer Gary Giddins refers to as “one of the great figures in American music, a composer and orchestrator of breathtaking originality.”

     In the interview, Crease talks of Evans’ life as having

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