• The publication of Arya Jenkins’ “LULU AND ME” is the 13th in a series of short stories she has been commissioned to write for Jerry Jazz Musician. 

     

  • In Robbie Robertson’s entertaining biography Testimony, the rock guitarist tells a short story about a conversation he overheard Bob Dylan having with The Byrd’s Jim (a.k.a. “Roger”) McGuinn concerning John Coltrane’s influence on McGuinn when he wrote “Eight Miles High.” 

  • Robert Hecht remembers his trip to Kansas City, and the impact it has had on his life 

     

     

  • Halema
    with the soulful jazz eyes
    deep dreaming the notes
  • "Lulu and Me" - a story by Arya Jenkins
  • Dylan, The Byrds, and John Coltrane
  • "Bird Lives" -- a memory of Charlie Parker's K.C.
  • "Halima and Chet" -- a poem by dan smith
Literature » Poetry

Two poems by Robert Nisbet

From red kite country, driving South,
Dai Grandpa, fresh from yesterday,
such yesterday. Only when the
June sun sank, had Dai – dudein’
up my shirt front, puttin’ on
the shirt studs – reached evening’s land
– and such a yester-e’en. (Dai caught
the breeze, his ship came home.)
He breakfasts now in wild kite

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Literature » Short Fiction

“One Suitcase” — a short story by Wayne Cresser

     Henry Bell wished the actress on the TV interview show wouldn’t smile so much. Most show folk, he thought, were not memorable. They were things, as he had written in one of his songs, made on the cheap from neon and crepe. Sometimes he believed it too. Then he’d remind himself that human beings wrote all kinds of wonderful tunes, like “The Wind” — the number that had made his mind reel when he was very young and made him think he could write songs.

     “The Wind” was eight, maybe nine, minutes of continuous jamming colored in with jazzy chords, an understated vocal and poetry. As a kid, listening to Dick Summer’s Subway show late at night on his transistor radio, stuck under the pillow to muzzle its volume, he thought he could trek into “The Wind” and the journey through its changes would be endless.

     Now, nearly forty, he wasn’t a kid anymore, and jazz-inflected rock music wasn’t his thing. At some point too, he’d decided that Circus Maximus was a pretty dumb name for a

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Features » Historic Journalism

Art Tatum on 52nd Street

In this entertaining short excerpt from Arnold Shaw’s 1971 homage to the jazz clubs of New York,  52nd Street:  The Street that Never Slept, Ralph Watkins, owner of legendary New York City clubs like Kelly’s Stable, the Royal Roost (the famed chicken restaurant nicknamed the “Metropolitan Bopera House” due to it being near the Metropolitan Opera House) and Bop City, remembers the blind pianist Art Tatum:

“The 52nd St. performer that stands out in my mind is Art Tatum, above everyone else.  Not only his musicianship but the fire in him.  He had a way when he was annoyed.  When people were talking during his playing, he’d stand up, bang the piano shut, stare in their direction, and tell them off:  ‘Quiet, you

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Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #104

In 1952, this trumpeter made his recording debut with the R&B group Chris Powell’s Blue Flames.  The following year, he toured Europe with Lionel Hampton’s band and led some recording sessions.  In early 1954, he recorded brilliant solos at Birdland with Art Blakey’s quintet, and by mid-year had formed a quintet with Max Roach.  Who is he?

 

Freddie Hubbard

Booker Little

Clifford Brown

Fats Navarro

Kenny Dorham

Lee Morgan

Art Farmer

Donald Byrd

Go to the next page for the answer!

[…] Continue reading »