• This edition of “Great Encounters” tells the story of the evening in c. 1930 that Louis Armstrong taught Buck Clayton how to perform a trumpet technique known as the “gliss”

  • In an excerpt from an interview with the drummer Art Taylor, Garner describes how he wrote his most famous composition, “Misty”

  • From red kite country, driving South,
    Dai Grandpa, fresh from yesterday,
    such yesterday. Only when the
    June sun sank, had Dai – dudein’
    up my shirt front, puttin’ on
    the shirt studs – reached evening’s land

     

     

  • “Cotton Candy on Alto Sax” by Julie Parks is the winner of the 46th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Award

  • Great Encounters #51
  • Where Erroll Garner wrote "Misty"
  • Two poems by Robert Nisbet
  • "Cotton Candy on Alto Sax" - by Julie Parks
Literature » Jazz Fiction by Arya Jenkins

“Voodoo Run” — a short story by Arya Jenkins

Allie drove her taxi with a smart ass attitude, smacking gum ceaselessly, and wore a Yankees cap backwards on her head on the job, even though she’d never watched a baseball game in her life, didn’t even like the game. Her dad had named her after a pitcher who’d won five straight World Series and Allie was always grateful that pitcher hadn’t been named Lefty or something like that.

Allie’s father had been the true baseball fan and Allie wore his cap in his memory. His real gift to her was love of music, jazz in particular. In her cab, she listened to WBGO, 88.3, remembering times she hung out with her dad in the garage listening to Miles Davis, Chick Corea, Wayne Shorter, experiments in sound, beautiful chaos while he fixed things. The garage was Bert’s space and his peace, or rather, the music was, and the smoke and silence that rose between them accentuated this. Whenever the strangers she drove around asked about her father, Allie always told them, “He went the way of the Marlboro man.” Cancer.

It surprised people to hear that she, a Millennial should enjoy jazz. “Jazz was like my Gerber food,” she liked to say. As a teen she dug hip hop enough to explore its fusion with jazz, but the fusion didn’t

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Witnessing the brilliance of Cecile McLorin Salvant

Last week I had the privilege of attending a show in Portland by vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant, the fast emerging superstar of jazz, of whom Wynton Marsalis has said “you get a singer like this once in a generation or two.”

The show – performed at the city’s 300 seat Old Church on August 30 – was one of the more astounding jazz performances I have ever seen.  Having been to hundreds (hell, probably thousands by now) of shows over the years in venues all over the globe, that is saying something!  I came away feeling as if I witnessed contemporary “greatness” of historic proportions.

Ms. Salvant, a 28-year-old native of Miami, was elegant, breathtaking, sensitive, angry, political, intellectual, adventurous, and everything in between (and always brilliant).  So many highlights — including Aaron Diehl’s performance on the Old Church organ, accompanying her on

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