• “The Wailing Wall” is the winner of the 48th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Contest
  • Hecht writes of a life-changing evening at a Roger Kellaway-Red Mitchell performance

     

  • The honored jazz writer Dan Morgenstern’s liner notes to the Pee Wee Russell Memorial Album are published in their entirety…

     

     

     

  • The Trailblazer

    (for Anita O’Day)

    Her name practically scats itself,
    Say it out loud, and you’re on your way,
    It’s a grand stand big band criss-cross delivery,

  • "The Wailing Wall" - a story by Justin Short
  • "The Sober Years" a true jazz story by Bob Hecht
  • Liner Notes: The Pee Wee Russell Memorial Album
  • "The Trailblazer" a poem by Freddington
Interviews » Biographers

Douglas Daniels, author of Lester Leaps In: The Life and Times of Lester “Pres” Young

ester Young was jazz music’s first hipster. He performed onstage in sunglasses and coined and popularized the enigmatic slang “that’s cool” and “you dig?” He was a snazzy dresser who always wore a suit and his trademark porkpie hat. He influenced everyone from B. B. King to Stan Getz to Allen Ginsberg. When he died, he was the subject of musical tributes by Charles Mingus (“Goodbye Pork Pie Hat”) and Wayne Shorter (“Lester Left Town”), and incidents from his life were featured in the movie ‘Round Midnight. […] Continue reading »

Interviews

Jazz Critic Gene Lees

Gene Lees is a well-known jazz chronicler. He is also a song lyricist, composer, singer, and author of more than a dozen volumes of jazz history and criticism, including the highly acclaimed Cats of Any Color: Jazz Black and White.

In You Can’t Steal a Gift, Lees writes of his encounters with four great black musicians: Dizzy Gillespie, Clark Terry, Milt Hinton, and Nat King Cole. Equal parts memoir, oral history, and commentary, each of the main chapters is a minibiography weaving together conversations Lees had with the musicians and their families, friends and associates over several decades.
[…] Continue reading »

Interviews

Ralph Blumenthal, author of The Stork Club: America’s Most Famous Nightspot and the Lost World of Cafe Society

For an entire generation, when Cafe Society was at its pinnacle, New York’s Stork Club was the world’s most storied night spot. It’s walls housed glamour and celebrities waited in line for the chance to be seen. Americans from all over the country, and soldiers fighting overseas, dreamed of visiting New York and being among the witnesses to the Stork Club’s elegant culture.

From its inception in the Roaring Twenties as a speakeasy for Jazz Age gangsters to its heyday in the 50’s when Jack wooed Jackie there, and headwaiters reaped $20,000 tips, everyone from Marilyn Monroe to J. Edgar Hoover gathered at the Stork Club.
[…] Continue reading »