• “The Wailing Wall” is the winner of the 48th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Contest
  • Hecht writes of a life-changing evening at a Roger Kellaway-Red Mitchell performance

     

  • The honored jazz writer Dan Morgenstern’s liner notes to the Pee Wee Russell Memorial Album are published in their entirety…

     

     

     

  • The Trailblazer

    (for Anita O’Day)

    Her name practically scats itself,
    Say it out loud, and you’re on your way,
    It’s a grand stand big band criss-cross delivery,

  • "The Wailing Wall" - a story by Justin Short
  • "The Sober Years" a true jazz story by Bob Hecht
  • Liner Notes: The Pee Wee Russell Memorial Album
  • "The Trailblazer" a poem by Freddington
Literature

“BETWEEN TWO WARS” a poem by Kenneth Rexroth

Between Two Wars

Remember that breakfast one November —
Cold black grapes smelling faintly
Of the cork they were packed in.
Hard rolls with hot, white flesh,
And thick, honey sweetened chocolate?
And the parties at night; the gin and the tangos?
The torn hair nets, the lost cuff links?
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Interviews

Kind of Blue: The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece author Ashley Kahn

In the spring of 1959, seven musicians got together in a converted church on 30th Street in Manhattan and made jazz history. Over forty years have passed since Miles Davis assembled his famed sextet to record Kind of Blue, and in that time the album has risen to the level of masterpiece.

In Kind of Blue: The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece, Ashley Kahn gives readers the unprecedented opportunity to enter the 30th Street studio and witness the creation of this remarkable album
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Interviews » Biographers

Peter Levinson, author of September in the Rain: The Life of Nelson Riddle

Nelson Riddle will forever be linked with the music and recordings of such unforgettable vocalists as Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Judy Garland, Rosemary Clooney, Linda Ronstadt, and dozens of others. Riddle not only helped to establish Nat “King” Cole’s career in the 1950s, but was also a major participant in reviving Sinatra’s career. He served as arranger of many classic Sinatra albums, including Only the Lonely and In the Wee Small Hours.

September in the Rain is the first biography of the most highly-respected arranger in the history of American popular music.
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Interviews

The Ralph Ellison Project: Horace Porter, author of Jazz Country: Ralph Ellison in America

The first book to reassess Ralph Ellison after his death and the posthumous publication of Juneteenth, his second novel, Jazz Country: Ralph Ellison in America explores Ellison’s writings and views on American culture through the lens of jazz music.

In Jazz Country, Porter addresses Ellison’s jazz background, including his essays and comments about jazz musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and Charlie Parker. Porter further examines the influences of Ellington and Armstrong as sources of the writer’s personal and artistic inspiration and highlights the significance of Ellison’s camaraderie with two African American friends and fellow jazz fans — the writer Albert Murray and the painter Romare Bearden.
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Interviews

Tim Madigan, author of The Burning: Massacre, Destruction, and the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921

On the morning of June 1, 1921, a white mob numbering in the thousands marched across the railroad tracks dividing black from white in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and obliterated a black community then celebrated as one of America’s most prosperous. Thirty-four square blocks of Tulsa’s Greenwood community, known then as the “Negro Wall Street of America,” were reduced to smoldering rubble.
[…] Continue reading »