Literature » Poetry

“Amen” — a poem by Roger Singer

“Moonlight Sonata,” by Debra Hurd




Jazz rained down in rivers
catching out strong soul 
and soft hands
rising to the call of music prayers
among blind angels 
who fail on color
and possess great mercy
scattering dark thoughts,
lost eyes,
and roads leading from home
and shoes speaking miles
and dirty hands
breathing out the land
with labor work
as cars roll by and tires splash
yesterdays puddles
turning up nations of dirt
as colors rich with rhythm
press the rock of flesh
draining the hate
and melting the change 
of years of blood chains
and stiff straw
and bed songs sung to children
and Sundays
with amen’s rising.







Roger Singer is a prolific and accomplished contributing poet who we have proudly published for well over ten years.  Singer has had almost 800 poems published in magazines, periodicals and online journals — 400 of which are jazz poems — and has recently self-published a Kindle edition of his book of jazz poetry called Poetic Jazz.

“Jazz poetry flows out with such ease,” Singer writes on his blog. “The people and places, the alleys and sawdust jazz clubs. The stories that bring jazz alive with horns and voices, from sadness and grief to highs at midnight and love gone wrong. The jazz is within us all. Find your poem and feel the music.”