• This edition of “Great Encounters” tells the story of the evening in c. 1930 that Louis Armstrong taught Buck Clayton how to perform a trumpet technique known as the “gliss”

  • In an excerpt from an interview with the drummer Art Taylor, Garner describes how he wrote his most famous composition, “Misty”

  • From red kite country, driving South,
    Dai Grandpa, fresh from yesterday,
    such yesterday. Only when the
    June sun sank, had Dai – dudein’
    up my shirt front, puttin’ on
    the shirt studs – reached evening’s land

     

     

  • “Cotton Candy on Alto Sax” by Julie Parks is the winner of the 46th Jerry Jazz Musician Short Fiction Award

  • Great Encounters #51
  • Where Erroll Garner wrote "Misty"
  • Two poems by Robert Nisbet
  • "Cotton Candy on Alto Sax" - by Julie Parks
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Lose weight…with the Duke Ellington “simply steak” diet!

After you indulge on Thanksgiving, consider giving Duke Ellington’s “simply steak” diet a try!  In his 1973 autobiography Music is My Mistress, from a chapter titled “The Taste Buds,” Duke Ellington writes about his special diet, losing thirty pounds while on it, and the resulting onstage antics.

 

__________

 

      In 1955 my doctor, Arthur Logan, told me I would have to take off twenty-two pounds. I tore up his suggested menu and made one of my own. Mine was simply steak (any amount), grapefruit, and black coffee with a slice of lemon first squeezed and then dropped into it. With the exception of a binge one day a week, I ate as much of this

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Features » In Memoriam

Remembering Jon Hendricks, 1921 – 2017

The great jazz singer Jon Hendricks died in New York earlier today at the age of 96.  In his New York Times obituary, Peter Keepnews writes that “Mr. Hendricks did not invent this practice, known as vocalese — most jazz historians credit the singer Eddie Jefferson with that achievement — but he became its best-known and most prolific exponent, and he turned it into a group art.” 

His work with Lambert, Hendricks and Ross was one of my gateways into jazz music.  My childhood home had only a few mostly dreadful record albums (and my beloved mother’s favorite radio station was KABL/San Francisco, with Mantovani and 101 Strings in heavy rotation on the Philco clock radio on the kitchen counter), but somewhere in the bowels of the house was Sing a Song of Basie LP that would somehow occasionally make its way on to our Hoffman stereo system’ turntable — in competition for time with Creedence and the Doors and Beatles 45’s.  Even as a little kid I could tell this was “hip” music, and it ultimately led me to an unforgettable experience.   

When I was living in Berkeley in the late seventies I went to see him on stage in a small North Beach

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Quiz Show » Jazz History Quiz

Jazz History Quiz #105

Upon leaving Charlie Barnet’s orchestra in 1941, this trumpeter wanted to start his own group, and, with the help of publicist/journalist Leonard Feather, became the first white leader in jazz history to organize an all-black group.  Who was he?

 

Mugsy Spanier

Bunny Berigan

Bob Burnet

Harry James

Ziggy Elman

Bobby Hackett

 

Go to the next page for the answer!

 

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